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Temperature Play What are the health implications?

#1 User is offline   tiamet Icon

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 01:38 PM

I did a scene several years back which involved my boy having to sleep in a piss trough without a blanket all night. I dropped the temperature down to about 65 degrees F to heighten the effect, and he suffered no harmful side effects despite shivering the whole night through. Ever since then I've been contemplating adding some edgy temperature play to my scenes, but have never gone through with it because I'd like to know more about the health implications.

Everything I've ever seen done with temperature play has involved the temperature of the implements, not the temperature of the environment. I understand the safety parameters there, I simply need to avoid actually burning or freezing the skin. I am more interested in scenes where a bottom is subjected to environmental temperature extremes and/or high contrast fluctuations between these extremes. I'm also interested in how adding water to the mix complicates things.

I'm aware of the fact that people can die of hypothermia or heat stroke, and that exposure to the elements can bring death as well. I'm also aware that exposure to cold temperatures can lower immune responses, and that sudden exposure to extreme temperature could induce shock. Obviously, I want to avoid these outcomes.

Here are some of the scene ideas I have turning around in my mind, to give you an idea of how I am considering using environmental temperature play.

The simplest is simply making the bottom be naked in a cold environment. Naked vs. clothed is a powerful dynamic enforcer. Intensifying that to the level of naked/cold/miserable vs. clothed/warm/comfortable seems both fun and sexy to me. Adding in chain and metal surfaces to heighten the effect would be nice. I could envision using such a scenario in a scene where the bottom has to perform some difficult (maybe impossible) task in order to acquire a blanket.

How far could I take this? At what point on the thermometer does cold become dangerous? How long can a person be exposed to what degree of cold without health complications?

I've long had a Chinese water torture scene in my head, and I'd like to use extremely cold piss. If I also did this in an extremely cold room, would the effect of the cold liquid be increased or decreased? If I did this in a very hot room using some sort of refrigerant to cool the liquid, would the temperature differences make the sensation of the cold liquid hitting skin more intense, or would it just become refreshing? I have also thought about starting the room off warm and slowly cooling it, making the scene progressively harder for the bottom to handle.

I have thought about doing a prolonged bondage/raunch scene in a very confined warm environment (increase the smells, sweat, etc.), then dragging the bottom out and washing them down with cold water from a high pressure hose and one of those harshly textured straw brushes you use for scrubbing horses. To what extremes could I take this? At what point does sudden temperature change become harmful and/or induce shock?

Any info on the health implications and safety parameters of this type of play would be greatly appreciated.
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#2 User is offline   MasterDale Icon

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 01:35 PM

I have a real appreciation for some of the wicked things that go in that mind of your's, Tia. Your ideas sound interesting, for sure. I would like to offer you advice here, but to be honest, it is really outside of my expertise. I am good with tools/toys. I am good messing around in people's heads. But when it comes to this kind of intimate knowledge of physiology, I have to defer to someone with a medical background. I am well read, but I do not have the kind of practical experience in these areas to be able to speak with authority.

Probably, the best people to talk to are experienced trauma specialists...EMT's, ER nurses and physicians, or other medical doctors who have handled cases of trauma. My guess is that you will be told there is a broad range of physical responses that could happen as a result of exposing someone to a specific set of conditions. Their age, sex, physical conditioning (athletic) and condition of their body ( electrolytes, sugar, vitamin deficiencies, existing medical problems, etc) will all come into play and make their response to that specific set of conditions appear almost random. The medical professionals can all tell you the worst case scenarios. But I am not sure if they can tell you with any degree of certainty why, given similar circumstances, one person's heart stops, another develops pneumonia, and still another person recovers after a short bout of hypothermia.

You have quite a bit of homework to do here if you dont want to run the risk of making the local news. I am curious to know what you learn, if you would like to share.

Also, given the worst case scenario of what you are proposing, you might want to look into an expensive little piece of safety equipment that I googled up. It's a prescription-less home defib unit that is supposedly so easy, anyone can use it. It was available at CVS drugstores for around $1400. Here is the product information at the manufacturer's site:

http://www.heartstar...rt_featured.asp

Good luck with this. Keep us posted,

M . Dale
Be careful of what you wish for....Posted Image ....you just might get it.
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#3 User is offline   tiamet Icon

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Posted 20 January 2009 - 11:02 PM

Thanks for the feedback. I'll continue to research this matter, and will be happy to share what I discover. I appreciate the link to the defrib unit. That would be handy to have on hand in general, since it takes the ambulance so long to get out to our place. I have been considering taking some medical training courses so that I could deliver critical care if anyone in the family got hurt. Maybe those classes will include some info on dangers of temperature extremes. Then I could kill two birds with one stone!
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Posted 28 January 2009 - 03:43 PM

Tiamet, while I've not used environmental conditions in a scene, I've been in some extremely cold environments, including standing in very cold water up to my hips for a prolonged time and I've thought for a long time on how this could be used in a scene. Hypothermia can come on very fast, and very hard and its extremely difficult to predict. Even mild hypothermia is something that should be treated in the ER, as it can degrade rapidly. So I strongly advise against exposing someone to continuous cold cool temperatures. Even very short term exposure to freezing temperatures can suddenly induce hypothermia.

On the other hand, going from an extremely warm environment to a much cooler one - such as from a sauna or hot outdoor air to cold water - can give very intense experiences. As long as the exposure isn't prolonged (a few minutes or less) and the water not too cold (think tap water temperature) the hypothermia issue can be avoided. 'Cool' water feels very cold if you're dunked in it suddenly.

I can easily imagine a scene where the bottom is bound and whole body dunked or sprayed with cold water, warmed back up in the warm environment then dunked/sprayed again...
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